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Fall 2021 NYU Tandon ECE Seminar Series on Modern AI: Deep inference
Title: Deep inference

Abstract: In the cognitive neurosciences and machine learning, we have formal ways of understanding and characterizing perception and decision-making; however, the approaches appear very different: current formulations of perceptual synthesis call on theories like predictive coding and Bayesian brain hypothesis. Conversely, formulations of decision-making and choice behavior often appeal to reinforcement learning and the Bellman optimality principle. On the one hand, the brain seems to be in the game of optimizing beliefs about how its sensations are caused; while, on the other hand, our choices and decisions appear to be governed by value functions and reward. Are these formulations irreconcilable, or is there some underlying information theoretic imperative that renders perceptual inference and decision-making two sides of the same coin?

Bio-sketch
Karl Friston is a theoretical neuroscientist and authority on brain imaging. He invented statistical parametric mapping (SPM), voxel-based morphometry (VBM) and dynamic causal modelling (DCM). These contributions were motivated by schizophrenia research and theoretical studies of value-learning, formulated as the dysconnection hypothesis of schizophrenia. Mathematical contributions include variational Laplacian procedures and generalized filtering for hierarchical Bayesian model inversion. Friston currently works on models of functional integration in the human brain and the principles that underlie neuronal interactions. His main contribution to theoretical neurobiology is a free-energy principle for action and perception (active inference). Friston received the first Young Investigators Award in Human Brain Mapping (1996) and was elected a Fellow of the Academy of Medical Sciences (1999).

Oct 21, 2021 11:00 AM in Eastern Time (US and Canada)

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