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Black Lives in Global Contexts: Migration - Shared screen with speaker view
Philip Kain
47:35
Such wonderful archival research.
Jeannine Chandler
47:55
^
DINA MAHNAZ SIDDIQI
52:11
So by the 30s “racial” categories are no longer as fluid or complex?
Jeannine Chandler
53:59
Fascinating— thank you Suzanne
D Simmons Jendayi
57:47
Name it....
Ifeona Fulani
01:03:13
In the USA Black is now pretty much a fixed racial category defined by the one drop rule, but elsewhere in the diaspora and on the continent blackness is not fixed. In parts of the continent we - Kaia, Suzanne and myself -would not be seen as black. In Cuba recently I was called ‘la mulatta’ in Martinique ‘la chabine’ (light skinned). Recognizing differences in skin color can result in colourism and discrimination; but can it also bee seen as a recognition of differences in experience resulting from skin color, as well as ancestral differences.
Carley Moore
01:03:29
Kaia’s pandemic blog and reporting for Ark Republic from Italy has been so amazing and such a resource.
Ifeona Fulani
01:03:45
^ yes!
Carley Moore
01:04:44
I’m so happy we’re talking about faculty experiences in Italy! Especially for BIPOC faculty.
Hema Sareen Mohan
01:05:04
Suzanne, thank you for sharing such rich history. Kaia, I'd love to hear what you think about how the electorate perceives the identity of Kamala Harris.
Joanna Chin
01:09:06
This is a fascinating conversation, and I’m curious to hear your thoughts on the idea of a potential movement to reclaim some fluidity of black identities in the U.S. and whether there is already any movement in that direction. As someone with Caribbean and Chinese heritage, I’ve often been frustrated with the fixed nature of how Black identity is approached in the U.S. so this discussion is really refreshing
DINA MAHNAZ SIDDIQI
01:10:08
So perhaps much more anxiety about being seen as darker skinned, therefore more overtly racist!
DINA MAHNAZ SIDDIQI
01:10:19
Italy
Jeannine Chandler
01:11:03
Have there been any movements/efforts to have those figures removed?
Kaia Shivers
01:11:28
yes jeanine
Carley Moore
01:12:49
I was teaching in Florence so long ago (2003 and 2004) and I was always uncomfortable about the reverence with which we were supposed to approached these objects.
D Simmons Jendayi
01:16:39
Thank you so much for tracing this path out! And 100% about hair/any boundary...don't touch
Ida Chavoshan
01:18:06
Thank you, Suzanne and Kaia! This has been a wonderful event. I love the conversation format. I learned so much!
Jessamyn Hatcher
01:18:15
Here’s a link to the exhibit/conference Suzanne mentioned: https://lapietra.nyu.edu/project/re-significations/
DINA MAHNAZ SIDDIQI
01:20:39
Casual but also deeply “thingyfying” of living black bodies.
Carley Moore
01:24:35
I am so happy to be part of this conversation. Thank you Suzanne and Kaia.
Carley Moore
01:26:20
I wonder what we can do as a faculty to care better for our BIPOC faculty and students as they work and study abroad? I don’t think this is a question for you to respond to, but there are such violences and micro aggressions that get buried under the “privilege” of teaching in Florence and we need to acknowledge and attend to this.
Ifeona Fulani
01:28:11
Thanks for those comments Kaia
David Ilouz
01:32:51
There’s a fascinating story of Black identity, complicated family histories, and the whitening of past lineage on NPR’s “Code Switch.”
David Ilouz
01:32:55
https://www.npr.org/2020/06/30/885179622/we-arent-who-we-think-we-are
Joanna Chin
01:33:48
interesting! Thanks for sharing that narrative
Kaia Shivers
01:35:16
Thank you David
D Simmons Jendayi
01:35:54
Carley thank you for that question
D Simmons Jendayi
01:39:23
Agree! Thank you thank you
Ifeona Fulani
01:39:34
^ agreed!
Ifeona Fulani
01:42:14
Me too!!
Ifeona Fulani
01:42:33
Almost everyday in Florence I was asked if I was Brazillian
Ifeona Fulani
01:43:53
But then, when I went to Brazil, everyone there thought I was Brazillian…
Heidi White
01:45:03
thank you so much suzanne and kaia - great conversation.
Carley Moore
01:45:29
Yes drinks!
Joanna Chin
01:45:32
Thank you SO MUCH Kaia and Suzanne for facilitating today’s conversation!
James Polchin
01:45:33
This was great! Thank you Suzanne and Kaia
Jeannine Chandler
01:45:38
This was fantastic, and I hope we have more of this. Thank you Suzanne and Kaia!
Ifeona Fulani
01:45:40
Thank you Suzanne and Kaia, that was a great conversation!
Adedamola Osinulu
01:45:42
This was wonderful. Thanks Kaia and Suzanne!
Carley Moore
01:45:43
Thank you Suzanne and Kaia! This made my day!
Jessamyn Hatcher
01:45:50
thank you, suzanne and Kaia—this was wonderful.
D Simmons Jendayi
01:45:56
And Danika and Lara - thank you!
Kaia Shivers
01:45:56
Thank you so much everyone.
Kaia Shivers
01:46:05
Thank you Suzanne!
Karri Whipple
01:46:06
Thank you so much Kaia and Suzanne! Such an important conversation.
DINA MAHNAZ SIDDIQI
01:46:08
DRINKS
D Simmons Jendayi
01:46:18
What a wonderful event - Kaia and Suzanne, AMAZING!
Carley Moore
01:46:33
This was such a good beginning to these conversations!
Minu Tharoor
01:46:36
Thank you Kaia and Suzanne…wonderful conversation. I learned a lot and mainly your insights and experiences.
Farzad Mahootian
01:46:49
Thanks so much Suzanne and Kaia! Great to see you both and learn so much today,. So deep!
Carys Fowler
01:47:00
Thank you so much!